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How to teach rebounding the offensive board in the "Equal Opportunity" Basketball Offense


Teams who run the "Equal Opportunity" Basketball Offense should be able to average 50% shooting from the field. Unfortunately, this fact has a downside. Such a shooting percentage often leads to lapses in offensive rebounding. Think about it. You still miss half your attempts at the basket. Your solution is to always send three players to the board for the rebound.

The single-most advantage of the “Equal Opportunity Basketball Offense” is that every player knows when a shot will most likely be taken. This advance knowledge gives your team the advantage in anticipating and breaking for the goal. Anticipation will always be the key to good offensive rebounding.

Hall of fame basketball coach, Arad McCutchan, once took me to watch Adolph Rupp’s Kentucky Wildcats play Vanderbilt. My old coach wanted me to count the number of times Kentucky got the second shot as a result of an offensive rebound. My chart revealed Kentucky failed only twice to get the second shot during the first half. Not only did they get the second shot but got as many as three shots.

If you want success, your players must spend time practicing going hard to the offensive board and getting the second shot. I can’t tell you how much time to spend to get results; however. If it takes 20 minutes a day, that’s what you need to do. A good high percentage play is to charge the offensive board in a highly aggressive manner. I mean everyone in the gym must know you were after the ball.

Many times I’ve watched players move timidly for the rebound, make contact, and get called for a foul. On the other side of the coin, I have watched other board plays where three players charge hard and bowl over everyone in their path and no foul was called. I’ve come to this conclusion, “the more players charging the boards aggressively, the less chance anyone will be penalized.”

To arrive at this conclusion I have considered the following facts:

  1. The number of fouls called on an offensive rebounder during an entire season.
  2. The value of an offensive rebound opposed to the negative danger of a foul. Usually an offensive rebound will give you two points whereby a foul by us gives them an opportunity for one point and a rebound by them gives them a chance for two points.
  3. Going to the board hard gives the opponents lumps and demoralizes their defense.
  4. Officials tend to ignore fouls where more than one are made.
  5. The Equal Opportunity Offense will give you an advantage at offensive rebounding if you do not waste by failing to take this calculated waste.

Go out and waste a few fouls and get more second attempts at the basket. The benefit is great.

Basketball Rebounding Drills

Today, basketball players are big and bigger. There are few weak players. It takes real courage to get under the basket with so many flying elbows and knees. Unlike football, there is no protective padding. It is my opinion that the only way youngsters will develop rebound courage and skill is to use drills.

Half-time talks won't get the job done. The practice session is where "men are separated from boys." Here are some drills that help the coach accomplish this objective. Many of these "rebounding and tipping" are interchangeable.

Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 1 Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 1

The purpose of this drill is to provide a game like conditions and some opposition when going to the offensive board.

Procedure:

  1. Arrange the team in three lines forming a semi-circle and facing the basket.
  2. The first player in line takes a short shot and goes for the rebound. At the same time, the first players in row 2 and 3 go for the rebound.
  3. The second players in all lines do likewise.
  4. After every player has participated, have different rows shoot the ball.
  5. Try to make every shot. Whatever you do - never try to miss a shot.
Competitive Basketball Defensive Rebounding Drill - Diagram 2

The purpose of this drill is to teach players how to block opponents, rebound, and deliver the outlet pass.

Procedure:

  1. Arrange players in three lines facing the basket.
  2. The first player in each line takes to steps and faces away from the goal in a defensive posture. The second players in line become the offensive rebounders.
  3. The coach tosses the ball up on the board and the second players race for a rebound. The players in defensive posture make contact with their opponent, blocking them, taking the rebound and deliver the ball back to the coach as an outlet pass.
  4. The defensive rebounders go to the end of their respective lines and the offensive rebounders take their places.

 

Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 2
Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 3 Competitive Race for Basketball Rebounding Position Drill - Diagram 3

The purpose of this drill is to give players practice in moving long distances to get into rebounding position. Teach them to not come charging in for a broad-jump rebound. This usually causes a foul.

Procedure:

  1. Divide the team into two groups starting at the free throw line extended or the normal forward position.
  2. The front player in each line takes two steps forward, turns his back to the goal, and assumes a defensive posture, becoming the defensive rebounders.
  3. The coach, at the head of the circle, tosses the ball on the board. All four players race for the ball. The defensive players should go to their particular opponent, making contact and blocking his path to the goal.
  4. They then exchange positions in the lines so as to get experience at all positions.

 

Competitive Basketball Superman Rebounding Drill - Diagram 4

The purpose of this drill is to develop aggressive rebounding behavior, chesting the ball with elbows extended, slapping and clutching it firmly and vocalizing.

Procedure:

  1. Place a line of players at a basket, with a coach toss the ball against the glass.
  2. Place another line of players in front of the goal with the first player too far under the basket.
  3. The ball is tossed on one side of the basket, directly in front of the line facing that side of the board. The first player in that line jumps, grabs the ball with both hands, grunting loudly, chesting the ball with elbows extended, and twists away from the player in the other line.
  4. See who grunts the loudest and most aggressive.
  5. Players rotate lines.

 

Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 4
Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 5 Competitive Basketball Free-Throw Rebound Position Drill - Diagram 5

This drill helps develop the habit of getting a good rebounding position as a free-throw attempt is made.

Procedure:

  1. Place two lines on both sides of the lane and facing the basket as illustrated in the diagram.
  2. The shooter should be one who needs a lot of free-throw practice. He goes through a regular routine and shoots a free-throw.
  3. The offensive and defensive players react to the shot by stepping into the lane with their outside foot. The defensive players keep their opponent sealed and on his back.
  4. After the rebound, the four participants exchange lines.
  5. Keep records to determine best rebounders.

 

Competitive Basketball one-on-one Rebound Position Drill - Diagram 6

Competition here greatly resembles actual game-type conditions.

Procedure:

  1. Place a line of players on both sides of the lane and facing the basket as illustrated in the diagram. Try to pair players of equal jumping ability.
  2. The shooter should be one who needs a lot of free-throw practice. He goes through a regular routine and shoots a free-throw.
  3. Both first players break for the rebound, fighting for position, and aggressively rebound the ball.
  4. These two players then go to the end of their respective lines

 

Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 6

Basketball Tipping Drills

Tipping a basketball into the basket is a dramatic feat of timing, coordination, and jumping ability. Players rarely need encouragement to work on this phase of the game, but tipping is a skill we cannot overlook.

It gives a player with springs in the legs an opportunity to double his scoring strength. Several tip-ins in a game often spells the difference in victory or defeat.

Obviously, leg strength is a primary prerequisite. Still, position and timing are the most important aspects of tipping skills; however, without practice, a high jumper can be a failure at the use of this skill.

Sell your players on the value of tipping. Practice tipping. Keep charts to show the results of practice efforts. Do not allow indiscriminate slapping at the ball.

Here are some drills that insure maximum results for the time spent on this facet of the game.

Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 7 Toss and Tip Drill - Diagram 7

Players will learn to adjust to direction of rebound while performing this drill.

The Procedure:

  1. Place a group in two lines facing a goal. Give the first player in each line a basketball.
  2. The first play in the left group tosses the ball against the glass then moves quickly out of the way to the rear of his line as the second player in that line uses his left hand to tip the ball into the basket.
  3. The first player in the group on the right tosses the ball against the board and moves quickly out of the way to the rear of his line as the second player in line tips the ball into the basket using his right hand.
  4. The drill continues in this manner until the end of the line is reached. Players should arrange themselves for a second round so that those who tossed the ball will become tippers.
  5. Players change rows after each has become a tipper.

 

Triangular Tipping Formation Drill - Diagram 8

The purpose of this drill is to practice blocking-out the defender so as to gain the best tipping position.

Procedure:

  1. Place the team in three lines as illustrated with six of them forming a semi-circle around the basket.
  2. 1, 2 and 3 are the tippers. The second three ride the backs of the tippers. The coach tosses the ball against the glass. The player with the best position attempts to tip the ball into the basket while the other two players block out for him.
  3. 1, 2 and 3 take the defensive positions and the defenders go to the end of their lines. Lines should be alternated.

 

Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 8
Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 9 Volleyball Basketball Tipping Drill - Diagram 9

The objective of this drill is to develop leg strength, stamina, and timing.

Procedure:

  1. Divide players into two groups facing the basket as illustrated.
  2. Give the first player in each line a basketball. In turn, he tosses the ball against the glass and taps it against the board five times, as though dribbling it on the floor. On the sixth jump, he uses both hands to tip it into the basket.
  3. The next player takes his turn after which he goes to the end of the opposite line.

 

Two Against One Basketball Tipping Drill - Diagram 10

The main purpose of this drill is to proved some competition.

Procedure:

  1. Three lines are formed. One on each side of the goal and one in the middle, facing the basket.
  2. The middle row are the defenders.
  3. The coach tosses the ball on the rim and the first players in the outside lines attempt to tip the ball into the basket while the player from the middle line attempts to stop them from scoring.
  4. Players alternate lines

 

Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 10
Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 11 Alternate Basketball Tipping Drill - Diagram 11

This is a conditioning drill that helps develop proper timing.

Procedure:

  1. Place a group of players on each side of the basket.
  2. The front player in each group starts the drill. One of them tosses the basketball against the board above the basket so that it caroms off the glass on the opposite side in front of the first player of the other group.
  3. That player immediately tips it all the way across the board to the other player by banking it off the glass.
  4. Play continues until every player has made ten jumps without a miscue.
  5. The next two players take a turn, and so forth until all players have participated.
  6. Players rotate to the back of the opposite line.

 

Endurance Basketball Tipping Drill - Diagram 12

Use this drill to evaluate the leg endurance of your players and practice at jumping and tipping.

Procedure:

  1. Line players in a row in front of a basket.
  2. Give the first player in line a ball and have him toss it against the board and start tipping.
  3. The other players count in unison to determine how many times the player can tip without error.
  4. Every player takes turn.
  5. Keep records to determine the "champion of the season."

 

Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 12
Competitive Basketball Rebounding Drill - Diagram 13 Free Throw Tip-in Basketball Drill - Diagram 13

The objective here is free throw shooting practice and practice in tipping from a free throw situation.

Procedure:

  1. Two players line up on each side of the lane as in a free throw setup.
  2. One player is at the free throw line as the shooter.
  3. After the player attempts a free throw, all three players try to tip the ball into the basket. If the shooter makes the basket, he continues to shoot until he misses. If he misses, the player who is successful at tipping in the rebound, becomes the shooter.
  4. The players rotate clockwise unless one is successful at tipping a rebound into the basket.

 


 

 
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